Tag Archives: quote

Who Would You Be If…A Koan

When working with clients, it is disturbing but a delicious moment when repeatedly coming up against fixed notions of who the client believes they are – as if they are an object like a table or something. This is especially so when the belief is not even serving the individual well in their everyday experience of themselves – their experience of life with this set of beliefs.

The good news is that we are NOT objects; we are verbs. So…this is why I ask a client the question: ‘if you didn’t know who you were (as in a fixed set of beliefs; a fixed storyline)/a single narrative), who would you be?’

The difficulty in this koan (above) is that we are attached to our fixed notions when indeed we have a freedom – and the responsibility that goes with that – to CHOOSE. So…why are we so resistant to choosing? I don’t really have the answers though I do have some ideas about the resistance. But if we choose to approach this conundrum as a koan, could we be off the hook for an answer? 

Koan, Japanese Kōan, in Zen Buddhism of Japan, a succinct paradoxical statement or question used as a meditation discipline. “Among other things, Zen is the task of re-learning how to live your daily life with a quirky, sometimes poetic spontaneity. “ (a quote is from Zachary Turpin, doctoral candidate in literature, 2016).

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So the real task might be the need or the opportunity, given the right support, to relearn who or what we believe to be true i.e. ‘carved in stone’ right…We even do this with our notions about fitness, relationships, roles as partners, parents, pastors (???) even. Lol. Why would we resist the freedom to simply choose a new definition of our self?

Minimalism is beginning to gain some popularity as a lifestyle. What if we were to marry these two ideas: Minimalism and the fact of being verbs?

Could it be as simple as what Mary Oliver shares in a stanza of her poem:

When Death Comes

“When it’s over, I want to say: all my life

I was a bride married to amazement.

I was the bridegroom, taking the world into my arms.”

Couldn’t we assert that if we are not willing to live LIVE, like a child ‘verbs’ through his/her moments, thriving… that we are simply getting by, settling for and lamenting, or possibly even lauding, comparing, judging, fearing, or gloating based on someone else’s thinking (a fixed set of beliefs).

Mary Oliver closes out her poem saying:

“I don’t want to end up simply having visited this world.” What about you? Verb and vitality or ‘same old, same old’ and lacking zest that celebrates the gift of the life you have been given?

Choose!

What would you have to relearn in order to freely choose?

Words UNSPOKEN Communicate

Communication for Connection – much more than the words we say.

The words we speak represent less than 10% of the message delivered.

Communicate

Even when we use words, it’s not just the words we say that matter – it’s the tone of our voice, facial expressions, or even the shapes we make with our bodies. The body knows and doesn’t lie.

Through learning The Model of Human Behaviour, I learned why my husband would have referred to me as, “excessively happy.” How is this possible!?

Ahhh: the case to be made for personalities, how we process information, and what are the respective needs of the various profiles (Model of Human Behaviour types). There are astonishing distinctions between the four types: D (Dominant type); I (Influence); S (Steadiness); and C (Compliance). Each of these ‘types’ has very unique differences and life-giving needs.

 

ChessHigh “C’s” tend to want to socialize less & focus on details, logic, and accuracy.

High “D’s” like to be in control, like a challenge, and need autonomy to make decisions & solve problems.

 

 

Social

High “I’s” most want others to be friendly, emotionally honest and want to be recognized for their contributions.

High “S’s” most need others to be relaxed, agreeable, cooperative & appreciative.

 

If/when we fail to perceive and speak to these differing ways of communicating and orienting, we might be down and out before we ever get up and going.

Have you ever felt like this, and maybe wondered – hey! What just happened?

The different profiles (and we all have some of each type in our unique blend) are actually like a different language that includes nuances specific to tempo, details, and the attending emotional needs that go along with our strengths.

Dr. Robert Rohm says we must beware to not tolerate and until we can annihilate but rather learn to celebrate our differences. However, we cannot beware until we are aware. The Model of Human Behaviour is a lot of fun, easy to learn, and mastery of this skill makes life and relationships improve like magic. As a Master Trainer and life skills coach (a “Guide to all things Great” ©), I never leave home without this highly energizing, user-friendly tool.

Communicate

Remember the adage: it’s not the words we say but the music we play? This learned skill is where the music happens – where words, tempo, and other unique flourishes have the result of everyone feeling like they matter. Isn’t this what we would all like?

Feeling seen and heard supports a sense of worth and respect. All manner of connections begin here – fundamentals in the human dynamic.

What could our world become if there was a little more of “us”/presence, engaging through the art and science of listening, and fewer of our words?

BTW: listening and responding to others in their preferred style (D, I, S, C) accomplishes connection – that sense of being love, peace, possibility, friendship, better relationships overall – even making better choices for our fitness and training needs. People “light up” when they learn about themselves inside this model.

Question: whose responsibility is it to get your needs met?

“Close the language-door and open the love-window. The moon won’t use the door, only the window.”  – Jelaluddin RUMI (1207-1273

— Judith
Judithlharrison.com

How do I keep my joints healthy for years to come?

Joint health, An article by Sarah Eby, Physiotherapist. 

As a Physiotherapist, this is a question I get frequently. It’s a common story: joints start to get stiff and achy as we get older, joints don’t recover as fast from injuries as they used to, or we start to develop joint pain during sports or our basic day to day activities.

Can you relate? If so, I am here to shed some light and instil some hope.

You can promote healthy joints throughout your body in two primary ways:

Through movement and strength.

Joint health

Our joints, all of our joints, are meant to move. They are built so that movement brings fresh blood flow and lubrication to the cartilage and joint surfaces to keep them smooth and healthy. The muscles and ligaments around our joints stay strong and malleable by stretching and contracting as our joints move through their full range of motion.

Joints are built to move, withstand load and compression, and adapt to the stresses that we apply to them throughout our daily movements.

What if my joints start to get stiff and achy? Shouldn’t I rest them so they don’t become more painful?

If you have had an acute injury or trauma, or are experiencing sharp pain with specific movements, then there may be a need for rest and recovery.

However, if there has been no trauma, it is likely that your joints just need to move more. It’s the old adage “move it or lose it” – our bodies adapt to the stresses that are placed upon them, so if you spend your days sitting at a desk or hunched over looking at your phone, your body with start to adapt to the limited range of motion or movement that you are regularly exposing it to and start to stiffen up. The cure is simple – move more. Figure out which movements feel the most stiff, limited or difficult, and slowly start to do more of that particular movement.

For example, one of the most common complaints I hear is about stiff hips. If this is the case for you, you could start each day by pulling your knees into your chest and then rotating your hips in a circular motion each morning before you even get out of bed. You’ll be surprised at how fast your hips start to feel less stiff and achy throughout the day.

The reason this works is that when you move your hips this way each morning, you are sending a message to the body that you require your hips to have a full knees to chest bend, and full rotation, and the joints will start to adapt. The cartilage will get compression and lubrication on all of its surfaces and stay healthy and supple for any movement you throw at it.

When joints get stiff or start to be painful our instincts are to stop moving them, which is often the opposite of what we need. Movement is medicine for our joints.

It’s hard on my joints to do a deep squat, run a marathon or lift heavy weights, right?

Wrong.

I have heard this time and again – and here is my answer: there are no “bad” movements or activities, just poor preparation.

Many of my patients have reported someone telling them they should stop doing x, y or z activity (often that they love doing) because it is harmful or because it is causing them pain.

Again, if you’ve had a trauma, surgery or illness that is affecting your joints then heed these warnings, but if you are clear of all these things, then let me give you some examples to demonstrate my point.

Yes, if you have never run a day in your life and you suddenly decide to start training for a marathon, without any knowledge about proper footwear, how to safely progress your distance or cross training (ie. separate strength training of the muscles that you use for running), then you are setting yourself up for injury. But, if you do your research, join a running group, strength train and invest in good footwear, then you will properly prepare your body and your joints for the stresses that running places upon them (and could crush that marathon goal of yours)! Running in and of itself is not harmful, but jumping into long distance running without the proper preparation could be hard on your joints.

In the same way as running – taking up yoga and suddenly doing repetitive deep squats, when you haven’t done more than squat down to a chair in years, could cause pain and inflammation in your knee joints.

And suddenly deciding to become a power lifter and dead lifting 100-200 lbs without first practicing how to do a proper deadlift without any weight, and then slowly increasing your weight incrementally, will put undue stress and strain through your lumbar spine, hips and shoulders.

Our joints will adapt to the load and movements they are given – but the process is not instantaneous. Problems arise, injuries occur or “harm” can be done to our joints when we try to do things that we have not properly prepared for.

Muscular strength is another big component of joint health. The deep muscles around our joints ie. the core muscles in our spine, the rotator cuff in the shoulder, and the glutes in the hip, are there to increase joint stability, maintain good alignment and promote functional joint movement. These deep muscles also protect the joints (the bones and cartilage) from compressive or shearing forces that could cause injury. You want to keep them strong!

Our larger muscle groups, such as our biceps/triceps and quadriceps/hamstrings, are meant to create large joint movements in our body – bending the elbow and bending the knee joints respectively, while our deep muscles fine tune these movements and protect the joints as they move. Both types of muscles are important for joint health, working in unison to create joint mobility and stability.

This is why Pilates is such a fantastic form of exercise.

It takes you through movements that involve your entire body, moving your joints through healthy ranges of motion, and works your core and the deep stability muscles surrounding your joints.

It is one of the best things you can do to keep your joints healthy for years to come.

Joint health is complex, and joint pain is not always clear cut. If you think you may have an injury or pain that needs attention or diagnosing, feel free to contact me at sarah@rootphysio.com or 519-757-7668 for a complimentary 10-minute consultation.

Written by Sarah Eby, Physiotherapist and KW Art of Fitness Client 

More about Sarah

Sarah Eby

Sarah is a Physiotherapist, Yoga Instructor, movement enthusiast and is in love with all of the classes she has been taking at KW Art of Fitness since moving back to Waterloo a few months ago. After years of studying and working in Toronto, treating a wide variety of patients in busy downtown clinics, Sarah decided it was time for a change – time to move “back home” and time to set up her own practice, Root Physiotherapy, in Uptown Waterloo.

Her vision was to create a physiotherapy practice where people receive quality, one-on-one care from a skilled Physiotherapist who has their best interests at heart; and to get to the root cause of your issues, so you can move well and be well for years to come.

When Sarah isn’t working, you can find her taking a Pilates or yoga class, hiking somewhere, cooking at home or spending time with her family and friends.

Learn more about Root Physiotherapy, click here. 

Rhythm of a Class – An Instructor Perspective

Rhythm of a Class

It is a Pilates Instructors dream to see and entire class moving in a synchronized way however that’s not always the case. Courtney talks about a layering technique she uses, it helps eliminate any uncertainty in a group class setting. Start with the foundation exercise and that is what the baseline is for the clients. She stays at this baseline until all the foundational cues that she is using are being applied by the clients. If the cues are not being applied it tells her that she doesn’t have the green light to move into more complex exercises.

Rhythm of a Class

Once these cues are being applied we can increase the challenge and add another layer, this might mean progression, functional movement, load transfer etc. As an Instructor we need to know that we are able to go together with the clients into more directional complex exercises, not just because the plan was to get there but because the clients are ready to go there.

As an Instructor we always want our clients to have a positive experience creating a sense of accomplishment and desire to come back week after week. When you go to a class and it’s just hard, you get tired, you do so many heavy exercises that your only option is to loose quality, give up or collapse, then the experience is negative as it will leave one with a feeling of having given up on themselves or that you just aren’t good enough, strong enough, fit enough …

What we are looking for in clients is that ‘aha moment.’ During rep one or two the expectations are for the client to “give it a go”, not perfection. Around rep five or six we should see that precision meter go up because the client realizes “oh, that is what you meant.” The next stage we instructors strive to bring into a movement is always the ‘holy crap’, ‘I am getting it because this is intense’ moment.  Now this stage is our fine line, as instructors we want you to feel it however eventually if we play this out to far the client starts to lose their belief in you the instructor if you choose to push them to the point of having to give up or the client chooses to persevere however in the struggle they loose that connection and trust in you. As instructors, we need to watch and observe, and most importantly need to give clients permission to draw those lines themselves as well.

The class or session should leave a client feeling motivated, inspired, curious about what strength and ability they will reach into next. Teaching clients to be light in an exercise when the intensity of that exercise sequence is taking you towards your strength potential, drawing in on your limits, is essential in allowing the clients to create great gains without driving them to disappointment in themselves.

Our voice is powerful, and what Courtney Miller speaks about in her podcast with Breathe Education is that she has a lot of success when ramping up an exercise to ensure that you are softening your voice, have a smile on your face, have a giggle, because we are ‘just doing pilates.’  This helps the client soften the tension and to discover how to use just enough effort to get the extra rep or two with quality and gives a positive note to land on.

To hear the Podcast interview with Courtney Miller yourself click here.  

An Instructors Perspective Series: Podcast overview with Courtney Miller

Courtney Miller is known in the Pilates world for her creativity; blending yoga, Pilates and functional fitness movements, her clear cueing skills and her way of staying ‘light’ during hard exercises. I watch her Pilates Anytime videos weekly to keep my own creativity juices flowing but also to pick up on her cueing and relaxed nature of getting her message across to a client without being too anatomical. Her classes are fun, light hearted, and most importantly challenging!

Recently my interest was drawn to a podcast interview that Courtney did with breathe education. There are five key points that continue to resonate with me as an instructor: the creative process, incorporating props, planning for clients, approach to cueing and the rhythm of a class.
 
The following series of blog posts is a summary of my perspective and interpretation of Courtney’s conversation and is based on her ideas, descriptions and concepts described within the podcast interview. I was inspired to write this for two reasons: to bring fellow instructors attention to Courtney’s interview as a tool for learning, and to give our clients a glimpse into what goes through the instructor brains during classes and private sessions. 

The Creative Process

As a Pilates Instructor we are constantly working towards solutions via modifications and or concepts that help our clients achieve beneficial and appropriately challenging options for overcoming obstacles. Each client’s body reacts differently to different movements, meaning, we are always on our toes trying to creatively challenge you as a client from one session or class to another. Our goal is to find the options that react well in your body.
 
Becoming a Pilates Instructor stems from a love of movement. We love to get our bodies onto the Pilates equipment or our mats with small apparatus to get into our own body movement sequences. Nine times out of ten our exercise ideas and flows will come out of a personal practice session. This is why you will see us in classes, in the corner quietly working out solo or doing private workouts with other instructors. 
 
Look out for “Incorporating Props” tomorrow! 
 

Get to know Stephanie Moore

Stephanie understands that no two clients are the same and believes that taking a fresh, fun customizable approach to fitness is vital to success. She draws on her vast knowledge, years of experience, spirit and tools to develop effective alignment patterns which bring understanding to her clients’ kinesthetic sense.

Stephanie also believes that the classes offered at Art of Fitness care for her clients not only physically, but mentally as well. It’s her goal that through specific mechanics, fitness is able to bring clarity, increase perception and stimulate the mind.

“Physical fitness is the first requisite of happiness.”- Joseph Pilates

Steph Moore

1. What is on your bucket list? Travel (everywhere), Pottery Wheel Class, Solo Art Show 
2. Where did you grow up? Smiths Falls, Ontario 
3. What food can you not live without? Summer Sausage 
4. Who is the funniest person you know? Am I allowed to say me? 
5. What is the best gift you have ever received?  Hansy
6. First thing you do in the morning? Walk Hansy 
7. What is the one thing people would never guess about you?  Nap time is sacred time
8. What’s on your bedside table? Lamp, Essential Oil Diffuser, Stack of books, water, sketch book, pen and pencil 
9. What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? Inspiration is the greatest gift to give others 
10. What’s the background on your computer? Hansy 

Get to Know Erin Mahony

Welcome to our new series “Get To know Our Instructors”. We grilled Erin with 30 random questions, that we will post for you over the Spring Session! Have a question for Erin? Email us and stay tuned to see it answered! 

Lower back weakness and muscular imbalance initially brought Erin to the practice of Pilates more than 15 years ago. What initially began as a prescription for rehabilitative and strengthening exercise has since developed into a tremendous passion of hers! As an ambitious woman going after a variety of athletic pursuits, Pilates compliments her lifestyle as both student and instructor. Training clients to be conscious of posture, breathing and alignment in various exercises, offers increased core strength and greater body awareness. As a Pilates instructor, Erin looks forward to educating her clients, challenging them and having fun!

Learn more about your Tuesday evening Instructor, Erin, below: 

1. What is on your bucket list? Open a market stall at the Paris Wincey Mills, run a hobby farm with my family, rent a houseboat for a holiday, knit a sweater, travel to Australia, play a gig at a coffee house
2. Where did you grow up? I’m a home-grown honey, born and raised here in Kitchener-Waterloo
3. What food can you not live without? Grandma Elsie’s homemade perogies
4. Who is the funniest person you know? Uncle Doug
5. What is the best gift you have ever received? My husband and two step-children
6. First thing you do in the morning? Meditate
7. What is the one thing people would never guess about you? I love to crochet
8. What’s on your bedside table? A lamp, my happiness journal and a few random pieces of jewellery
9. What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? “Always remember, everyone is doing their best with what they know”
10. What’s the background on your computer? Boring old black default screen…it’s a work laptop so I haven’t personalized it

Want to take a class with Erin? Click here to register.   

Certifications Include:

  • Certified PhysicalMind Institute Vertical and Matwork Intensive
  • Body Harmonics Pilates Reformer Intensive – Apprentice
  • Half Marathon Runner, Participant in Sprint level triathlons
  • Member of ROW Masters Swim Program

Limitless

“There is no limit to the improvement of movement”- Moshe Feldenkrais

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To Win

Tactics, fitness, stroke ability, adaptability, experience, and sportsmanship are all necessary for winning. -Fred Perry

Finding Time

Those who do not find time for exercise will have to find time for illness. – Earl of Derby