Tag Archives: muscles

Words UNSPOKEN Communicate

Communication for Connection – much more than the words we say.

The words we speak represent less than 10% of the message delivered.

Communicate

Even when we use words, it’s not just the words we say that matter – it’s the tone of our voice, facial expressions, or even the shapes we make with our bodies. The body knows and doesn’t lie.

Through learning The Model of Human Behaviour, I learned why my husband would have referred to me as, “excessively happy.” How is this possible!?

Ahhh: the case to be made for personalities, how we process information, and what are the respective needs of the various profiles (Model of Human Behaviour types). There are astonishing distinctions between the four types: D (Dominant type); I (Influence); S (Steadiness); and C (Compliance). Each of these ‘types’ has very unique differences and life-giving needs.

 

ChessHigh “C’s” tend to want to socialize less & focus on details, logic, and accuracy.

High “D’s” like to be in control, like a challenge, and need autonomy to make decisions & solve problems.

 

 

Social

High “I’s” most want others to be friendly, emotionally honest and want to be recognized for their contributions.

High “S’s” most need others to be relaxed, agreeable, cooperative & appreciative.

 

If/when we fail to perceive and speak to these differing ways of communicating and orienting, we might be down and out before we ever get up and going.

Have you ever felt like this, and maybe wondered – hey! What just happened?

The different profiles (and we all have some of each type in our unique blend) are actually like a different language that includes nuances specific to tempo, details, and the attending emotional needs that go along with our strengths.

Dr. Robert Rohm says we must beware to not tolerate and until we can annihilate but rather learn to celebrate our differences. However, we cannot beware until we are aware. The Model of Human Behaviour is a lot of fun, easy to learn, and mastery of this skill makes life and relationships improve like magic. As a Master Trainer and life skills coach (a “Guide to all things Great” ©), I never leave home without this highly energizing, user-friendly tool.

Communicate

Remember the adage: it’s not the words we say but the music we play? This learned skill is where the music happens – where words, tempo, and other unique flourishes have the result of everyone feeling like they matter. Isn’t this what we would all like?

Feeling seen and heard supports a sense of worth and respect. All manner of connections begin here – fundamentals in the human dynamic.

What could our world become if there was a little more of “us”/presence, engaging through the art and science of listening, and fewer of our words?

BTW: listening and responding to others in their preferred style (D, I, S, C) accomplishes connection – that sense of being love, peace, possibility, friendship, better relationships overall – even making better choices for our fitness and training needs. People “light up” when they learn about themselves inside this model.

Question: whose responsibility is it to get your needs met?

“Close the language-door and open the love-window. The moon won’t use the door, only the window.”  – Jelaluddin RUMI (1207-1273

— Judith
Judithlharrison.com

Mind Your Words: Teach Don’t Tell

For the Pilates participants who may be reading this, the perspective below offers a glimpse into part of what goes on behind the scenes;

the mind of the instructor;

the person who can NOT count to 10 — forwards or backwards 😀

The aim is to clear up just why we, Pilates Movement Instructors, are so darn persnickety, and why we take our storytelling skill so seriously!

Patience

Teach, Don’t Tell

Movement Instructors connect words with actions, simultaneously offering relevant reasons to motivate the participants intention and attention to said action. We are fostering intelligent communication for connection between teacher and client; the cues we use are meant to describe and inspire the idea of a movement that has energetic expression. This is our art.

Our underlying quest as instructors in our storytelling skill is for clients to experience success. To feel like the time spent pursuing quality movement was a worthwhile endeavour.  Sometimes, this pressure surrounding the self created quest takes our storytelling skills down a notch. We find ourselves relying to heavily on anatomical details or ‘feeling’ the exercise/movements, in a specific area or repeating go-to phrases the industry has latched on to.

There is a danger in being too anatomical or too focused on what or where someone “should be feeling” an exercise. Let’s face it; some of us don’t care what moves who where, some of us feel to much and even more of us don’t have any feelings at all …. AND we’re all snowflakes, each one of us different, with different needs and goals.

When the Movement Instructor and the client can get out of our own way and step cleanly into the moment in front of us, the body systems and the brain know how to move, the story is being told, teaching action is happening, the magic takes place …

Motivation and the Pleasure Seeking Brain

The pleasure seeking brain is continually searching out and repeating action that makes life easier. When action results in making life easier the brain categorizes the action as pleasure. The pleasure causes the brain to look for ways to groom and groove excellent movement patterns, this becomes motivation.

Storytelling skill (cueing) aims to borrow that instinctive desire and drive the individual to continually ‘tidy up’ movements, until there is the awesome moment of “effortless effort”.

“Effortless Effort”

What?! (Insert eye roll here…)

Pilates is designed to give you the opportunity to work better, THEN harder, while encouraging participants to always avoid working harder then is necessary.

Clean (i.e effortless effort) movement demands efficiency, Pilates teaches that, grooms that, and ultimately what was once your workout becomes your warm up.

As Movement Instructors we endeavor to:

Step up, be prepared to explain an action in several different ways. Explore cueing until you see the action being understood or you see the light bulb going off behind the eyes of the client.

Work towards understanding how the client learns. What brought the client through the door in the first place? Why do they keep coming back? We need to learn to adapt our cues and expressions to match the person in front of us.

Be clear. We all have our ‘go to’ expressions. For example: belly button to spine. Let’s make sure we first express what we actually are asking for. Avoid relying on and assuming a phrase will always inspire the correct action.

Address complex action simply. Sometimes the list of cues are LONG, be sure to highlight a priority. In other words, emphasis what shouldn’t be sacrificed in order to accomplish another action further down the list of cues.

One of my favorite teaching moments is between breathing and action. If the effort to create an action causes you to hold your breath, the sacrifice is too great. In other words, if you catch yourself holding your breath, reign it in, work only as hard as you can breath consistently.

Teach, Don’t Tell

Simply means exploring with clients to learn what to say in order to help someone organize and co-ordinate a movement. Look at what happens when the client does what you asked them to do.  Then identify and address perhaps TWO of the most important corrections according to their demonstration.

Both the Movement Instructor and the client need to allow for room to grow into the actions. It takes time for the brain to instinctively and confidently adapt movement patterns. Every energetic expression of the teachers cue has to sort through outside force, internal deviations or habits and the complexity of the action.

Your brain and body systems know this and will learn to re-organize itself according to the brain’s pleasure response.

Client

As Clients, You Can Help Us Be Better:

We need you to speak up when what we’re asking for sounds like a foreign language.

Do you keep hearing a phrase that you feel or think is wrong for your body? Ask the instructor to explain themselves or to paraphrase what they are saying.

If you’re given a bony landmark or a muscle or a feeling/sensation as a reference point, speak up if that reference point is even a little bit foggy. There are hundreds of ways to describe an action.

Be patient with yourself, it’s just Pilates. #gregpember

Brilliance Lives Here: Leonard Cornelisse

We would like to introduce one of our clients, Leonard, who participates in weekly group classes, including Spin, Matwork and Reformer. 
 
Leonard comes into the Studio with a ready to work attitude. He has the ability to challenge his Instructors to get him to work deeper in his movements. We, as Instructors, love to come up with new ways to push him; and feel a sense of a job well done once an email pops through after classes telling us just how much he feels his muscles. Leonard is warm and witty, making an entire class laugh with his out of no where one liners. 
 
Leonard
 
A few words from Leonard… 

 

I came to KW in 1997 after having studied Audiology and working at the University of Western Ontario. I work as a hearing scientist for a Canadian hearing aid company called Unitron, in Kitchener.

Somewhere around middle age, I had the realization that I was no longer young and rather more out of shape than I cared to admit. I started swimming, and then added cycling as exercise. When the following winter came, I decided to try running and as summer approached I realized that I should put those three activities together and at least attempt a beginner triathlon. Somewhere in that time period I also started to practice yoga in an effort to improve my flexibility. I enjoyed training for and participating in various running, cycling and triathlon races for several years, racing mostly for fun. However, I started to have various injuries and issues. Fortunately through a running club I learned about the benefits of Pilates. I started at KW Art of Fitness about four years ago. I chose KW Art of Fitness, because of the variety of classes that it offers, in addition to Pilates, and because it is a smaller more intimate studio, with very friendly and personalized service.

In my free time, I enjoy walking my dog or playing with my grandchildren, when I am not exercising.

How do I keep my joints healthy for years to come?

Joint health, An article by Sarah Eby, Physiotherapist. 

As a Physiotherapist, this is a question I get frequently. It’s a common story: joints start to get stiff and achy as we get older, joints don’t recover as fast from injuries as they used to, or we start to develop joint pain during sports or our basic day to day activities.

Can you relate? If so, I am here to shed some light and instil some hope.

You can promote healthy joints throughout your body in two primary ways:

Through movement and strength.

Joint health

Our joints, all of our joints, are meant to move. They are built so that movement brings fresh blood flow and lubrication to the cartilage and joint surfaces to keep them smooth and healthy. The muscles and ligaments around our joints stay strong and malleable by stretching and contracting as our joints move through their full range of motion.

Joints are built to move, withstand load and compression, and adapt to the stresses that we apply to them throughout our daily movements.

What if my joints start to get stiff and achy? Shouldn’t I rest them so they don’t become more painful?

If you have had an acute injury or trauma, or are experiencing sharp pain with specific movements, then there may be a need for rest and recovery.

However, if there has been no trauma, it is likely that your joints just need to move more. It’s the old adage “move it or lose it” – our bodies adapt to the stresses that are placed upon them, so if you spend your days sitting at a desk or hunched over looking at your phone, your body with start to adapt to the limited range of motion or movement that you are regularly exposing it to and start to stiffen up. The cure is simple – move more. Figure out which movements feel the most stiff, limited or difficult, and slowly start to do more of that particular movement.

For example, one of the most common complaints I hear is about stiff hips. If this is the case for you, you could start each day by pulling your knees into your chest and then rotating your hips in a circular motion each morning before you even get out of bed. You’ll be surprised at how fast your hips start to feel less stiff and achy throughout the day.

The reason this works is that when you move your hips this way each morning, you are sending a message to the body that you require your hips to have a full knees to chest bend, and full rotation, and the joints will start to adapt. The cartilage will get compression and lubrication on all of its surfaces and stay healthy and supple for any movement you throw at it.

When joints get stiff or start to be painful our instincts are to stop moving them, which is often the opposite of what we need. Movement is medicine for our joints.

It’s hard on my joints to do a deep squat, run a marathon or lift heavy weights, right?

Wrong.

I have heard this time and again – and here is my answer: there are no “bad” movements or activities, just poor preparation.

Many of my patients have reported someone telling them they should stop doing x, y or z activity (often that they love doing) because it is harmful or because it is causing them pain.

Again, if you’ve had a trauma, surgery or illness that is affecting your joints then heed these warnings, but if you are clear of all these things, then let me give you some examples to demonstrate my point.

Yes, if you have never run a day in your life and you suddenly decide to start training for a marathon, without any knowledge about proper footwear, how to safely progress your distance or cross training (ie. separate strength training of the muscles that you use for running), then you are setting yourself up for injury. But, if you do your research, join a running group, strength train and invest in good footwear, then you will properly prepare your body and your joints for the stresses that running places upon them (and could crush that marathon goal of yours)! Running in and of itself is not harmful, but jumping into long distance running without the proper preparation could be hard on your joints.

In the same way as running – taking up yoga and suddenly doing repetitive deep squats, when you haven’t done more than squat down to a chair in years, could cause pain and inflammation in your knee joints.

And suddenly deciding to become a power lifter and dead lifting 100-200 lbs without first practicing how to do a proper deadlift without any weight, and then slowly increasing your weight incrementally, will put undue stress and strain through your lumbar spine, hips and shoulders.

Our joints will adapt to the load and movements they are given – but the process is not instantaneous. Problems arise, injuries occur or “harm” can be done to our joints when we try to do things that we have not properly prepared for.

Muscular strength is another big component of joint health. The deep muscles around our joints ie. the core muscles in our spine, the rotator cuff in the shoulder, and the glutes in the hip, are there to increase joint stability, maintain good alignment and promote functional joint movement. These deep muscles also protect the joints (the bones and cartilage) from compressive or shearing forces that could cause injury. You want to keep them strong!

Our larger muscle groups, such as our biceps/triceps and quadriceps/hamstrings, are meant to create large joint movements in our body – bending the elbow and bending the knee joints respectively, while our deep muscles fine tune these movements and protect the joints as they move. Both types of muscles are important for joint health, working in unison to create joint mobility and stability.

This is why Pilates is such a fantastic form of exercise.

It takes you through movements that involve your entire body, moving your joints through healthy ranges of motion, and works your core and the deep stability muscles surrounding your joints.

It is one of the best things you can do to keep your joints healthy for years to come.

Joint health is complex, and joint pain is not always clear cut. If you think you may have an injury or pain that needs attention or diagnosing, feel free to contact me at sarah@rootphysio.com or 519-757-7668 for a complimentary 10-minute consultation.

Written by Sarah Eby, Physiotherapist and KW Art of Fitness Client 

More about Sarah

Sarah Eby

Sarah is a Physiotherapist, Yoga Instructor, movement enthusiast and is in love with all of the classes she has been taking at KW Art of Fitness since moving back to Waterloo a few months ago. After years of studying and working in Toronto, treating a wide variety of patients in busy downtown clinics, Sarah decided it was time for a change – time to move “back home” and time to set up her own practice, Root Physiotherapy, in Uptown Waterloo.

Her vision was to create a physiotherapy practice where people receive quality, one-on-one care from a skilled Physiotherapist who has their best interests at heart; and to get to the root cause of your issues, so you can move well and be well for years to come.

When Sarah isn’t working, you can find her taking a Pilates or yoga class, hiking somewhere, cooking at home or spending time with her family and friends.

Learn more about Root Physiotherapy, click here. 

The Underbelly of the World of Overwhelm: More is NOT Always Better

It has been said the “What we do matters. Who we are matters much more.”

And, that one word – more – is our key to todays look in on where is your life hanging out – in excellence or overwhelm?

Judith

Lets start with a few questions like:

  • Are you doing your best work as a leader yet feeling you are failing to make an impact? Or, if not you, perhaps someone close to you?
  • Have you ever felt stuck, powerless to change your environment or even your day-to-day experience of a world moving at a frenetic pace of demands for “more”?
  • Do you feel too overwhelmed to enjoy life, unable to sort out the demands on your time

If you answered yes to any one of these questions then settle in, take a deep breath or three and ponder the following with us, if you will.

One of the disabling elements against our sense of a fit life – emotional or physical – is a mindset that measures success by demanding “more”. In all our training and conditioning – physical fitness included – the mistake that repeats itself, and drives us relentlessly, is how we isolate and fragment as though the different parts of a self don’t work together. This includes all of the aspects that we imagine constitute a self, or a life, or a job well done. And, to worsen this sorry state of affairs, we measure our success based on outer appearances or what we think others will value. When we keep the various parts of our ‘self’, and aspects of our life, isolated each from the other we are guaranteed to eventually experience exhaustion, loneliness, angst, and eventually dissatisfaction and/or disillusionment, even despair.

This stems from a paradigm of doing rather than being, among other aspects of our socializing experience. That is to say we derive our sense of worth from an exterior orientation rather than an interior sense of stability and wellbeing.

art

An outer orientation sets up like this: when I get this…I will be happy; when I accomplish that…I will be a success; when I have ‘this much’ in my bank account…I will be good enough; when I…well, you get the idea. We “do this in order to get that”. This approach is like an addiction; it leaves us coming up with/as ‘not enough’ and needing the ubiquitous “more”.

“More” is killing us: stress, judgments, anger, frustration, depression, and exhaustion; dis-eases of the body-mind-soul. Where is “more” showing up in your life? What would it take to set up an attitude of “The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Bleep” (see Events at WellnessVie.com). In this book Mark Hanson advises us to get to know our limitations and accept them – this, he says, is the real source of empowerment. I like to think of this in terms of the malcontent content and the capacity for living with our vulnerabilities.

Isn’t it a time for a quiet revolution? Would you be willing to ask yourself some different questions and not be in a hurry to find the answers or reach the goal at the expense of a well-lived journey? Dare to “Live the questions”- questions that address life from a perspective of ‘is this life-giving’?

As a Psychotherapist and Guide to all things Great, I know that our greatest gift is our willingness to bring curiosity to our life’s experiences – as children do! They live life as an adventure, and thereby thrive; why not us? Why not now? And, if not now, when? 

– Judith

Mind Your Words: The Art of Cueing

In Movement and in Life
  Steph - Arc

Storytelling, this is the daily practice of any movement instructor, most commonly referred to as ‘cueing’. 

Judith and I (Stephanie) are going to be offering and exploring ideas that are meant to tantalize your mind, create questions and perhaps offer those reading this blog an opportunity for a deeper understanding of yourself, or at the very least of your Movement Instructor. I will be discussing concepts from the perspective of a teacher in movement and how individuals participating in movement may get more from their personal fitness regimes.

At our studio we have groomed within ourselves a style that brings the opportunity to work with people Stephaniewhose desire it is to explore, define, improve and align their bodies with grace, strength and efficiency. This desire to learn will take them into aging with a quality of life that only mobility offers. 

The art of Pilates is to look at the body in front of us and to discover the most direct route to address its movement patterns. The challenge in this art lies in the practice of our storytelling skill (cueing). We are always working to improve this storytelling skill in order to best use the power behind our words to teach a deep understanding of movement unique for each person.

Mind Your Words blog series has the grand intention of exploring what is behind the words we choose to use, at times over use, as we look for ways to teach people the powerful connection between their minds, their bodies and their own personal responsibility in the pursuit of creating an exquisite quality of life.

In today’s temperament with concern to our use of words and how they impact others, we find ourselves on a swords edge between being mindful of the words we use and being fearful of how our words may be misunderstood. This fear has the potential to destroy communication and to create even more loneliness in the human race. A couple of weeks ago, a beautiful mind walked into my Pilates class and shared a snippet of learning that has stuck with me, “everyone communicates, not everyone one connects.”

Our challenge is to connect through communication.

Our wish is to be clear with what we mean.

We ask our clients and anyone who ends up reading this blog to explore personal responsibility in defining, exploring, perhaps redefining our understanding of the words we use and how these words hit us on a daily basis.

Aristotle once stated, “it is the mark of an educated man to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.” 

When you read Aristotle’s quote, how do you interpret it?

The message I “hear” when reading this quote or better yet saying it out loud is: “it is sign of an open and balanced mind when able to contemplate an other’s collection of experiences, life concepts or definitions behind words, without taking it as a personal attack on belief systems, self expression and experiences.”

Exploring what’s behind a word through the thesaurus:

Cueing: signal, sign, indicate, prompt, reminder, word, gesture
Fitness: good health, strength, robustness, vigour, well-being
Tantalize: tempt, entice, lure, allure, beguile, excite, fascinate
Intention: design, purpose, goal, wish, desire, ambition, idea
Temperament: nature, frame of mind, mood, attitude
Responsibility: duty, task, function, role, common sense, power

Introducing yet another Brilliant Client

We would like to introduce one of our clients, Judith, who participates in weekly private sessions with Stephanie.
 
Judith brings with her a playful and curious attitude, warmth for all those who cross her path at the studio and has been the long time source of Stephanie’s intrigue into the ‘Art of Cueing.’ Judith and Stephanie will be exploring words and their potential together through an upcoming monthly blog: “Mind Your Words”, a punny play on the British phrase “mind your step”; “mind the gap”; “mind your head”; because we are if nothing else funny like that.
 
Judith
 
A few words from Judith:
 
We need the accountant on board to definitively answer the question of how long I have been coming…I believe it may be around a ‘bakers dozen’ of years but honestly I could say it has been a ‘lifeline and a life time’. The reason I say this is because in the intervening time since becoming acquainted with Stephanie and the studio, I have become acquainted with my body and fitness in an entirely new way – nothing short of being ‘reborn’? In this process, I have had the joy (not without its frustrations, I might add…) of relearning what is fitness, my body, and how the body functions in its beautiful, natural and powerful design.
 
At  the time of joining the studio, I had been working with a great massage therapist who enjoyed boasting (appropriately!) about the amazing things she was getting from classes with Stephanie. I was unable to resist the promise of ‘what else was possible’. I joined. and, all I would add is that “excellence begets excellence”:) Whats not to love about this!?
 
I have always loved being active but I had never learned how to deeply appreciate the process from a disciplined approach that begins with honouring the body rather than the intended outcome, in that order of priority.
 
Being active over the years included running, skiing, yoga, Tai Chi. Qi Gong, horseback riding, walking, cycling, and several attempts at trying to learn how to swim…oh well, forget the swimming – LOL.
 
Fitness with Stephanie has led me to an entirely new way of knowing: my body, myself, healing, spiritual connections, weaving my outside world into my studio workouts and vice versa – just for starters.
As a practicing “Guide to all things Great (I work as a life coach and psychotherapist), I have through this journey also come to realize how central the body, emotions, the mind are all interconnected to a healing journey. Therefore, I have now also become certified as a Yoga Teacher and am exploring how to weave this into the healing journey for others. WOW! You may catch a glimpse as to why I say this is nothing short of being “reborn”. Thank you Steph and all who make the KW Art of Fitness a great experience.”

People who you’ll bump into at our Studio

So you’ve met our instructors but who else helps us make the studio brilliant?

We would like to introduce one of our clients, Steve Knipping, who has been coming for the past 5 years, 3 times a week, participating in reformer classes, spin classes and privates sessions.

Steve brings with him a warm and ready sense of humour, always has a motivating, albeit funny, word for other participants and he has this remarkable ability to connect golf lessons into potential real life lessons.

Tell us a bit about yourself Steve: 

I am 54 years old and have been married for 34 years to Lianne. We have two daughters, Lauren and Danielle. Lauren is a registered dietitian, married and lives in Boston; Danielle is a registered nurse and lives in Hamilton.

I am a partner at WalterFedy – a consulting architectural and engineering design firm in Kitchener. As a  senior project manager I am primarily involved in land development projects and client relations.

How long have you been coming to the Studio?

I’m going to say 5 years but I’m not 100% sure; neither is Steph as she can’t count nor is she overly aware of time. 

Why did you start coming to the Studio?

I initially came as part of a golf/pilates combo lesson. I had signed up for golf lessons with Rob Hannah and it included some sessions with Steph.

At one of the classes we did some exercise that completely “released” my back and that made me think I might be on to something that could help me. I had been looking for something to help improve my fitness but most things I had tried just seemed to aggravate some of my past injuries – bad back, bad shoulder, rotator cuff issues, hip issues. Pilates seemed to be something I could do, challenge myself, get in better shape but not hurt myself. I started with one on one training with Steph, which I still do, joined a group Pilates class and also joined a spin class.

Why do you keep coming back?

I like the small class sizes. The atmosphere of the studio is focused but relaxed and encourages a balanced approach to fitness and life. The breaks between sessions are nice and help you recharge and keep things fresh. The instructors are all great, as well as the other clients. There is a common element to the instructors and clients with respect to values and general approach to life. This makes it easy to blend in together during the group classes whilst having space for personal modifications when necessary.

What other fitness, sport or outdoor activities do you participate in?

My big passion (and frustration) is golf, but I also enjoy cycling, curling in the winter as well as snow shoeing. Once I retire I would like to add another Pilates class to my routine.

Meet Steve – The Studio Plant Man

Ever wonder how the Studios plants stay hydrated and oh so healthy?! Learn about the man behind the Studio plants… 
 
Steve
 
Where does your love for plants come from? 
 
When I was 13, living in Bracebridge, I went to Lake of Bays to my grandparents summer resort to work.  My responsibilities included helping my Uncle Ross. He had his own Green house and planted renowned flower gardens on the property of Point Ideal.  I developed an interest in flowers and tried to learn more from him although being a klutz wasn’t an asset!  After three summers at Point Ideal I went to work for my dad’s construction company in Bracebridge and helped around our family home with the flowers and vegetable gardens etc.  I was always fascinated in what could become of just a little cutting, seed or bulb.  
 
Then in University, our neighbour had a Hibiscus that she needed to part with and I took it to London in 1974.  It became fun to have “a plant” – not something most of my friends really cared about – and I was determined to keep it alive.  I was successful and in fact that original hibiscus is growing happily today in Forest hill although it has almost taken over 1/3 of the room that it is in.  
 
I found after seeing my hibiscus slowly loose leaves etc, that you have to repot these plants quite regularly.  To do that you remove about 1/3 of the root ball and about 1/2 – 2/3 of the foliage.  This made a tremendous difference and of course I had the material for more.  You normally have to soak 3 or 4 stems in water for a couple of months to get possibly one new plant.  I like the challenge! 
 
Tips from the Plant Man
 
If you really want to have plants I would always recommend that you learn about them and have a real interest in their survival.  I find plants soothing and invigorating at the same time.  Determine what kind of sunshine you have available in which windows in your home and decide what you will place plants on.  Be careful about staining or damaging hardwood floors or carpet.  
 
I find growing plants very rewarding and I can see them as a motivator to move and care for and keep happy as I “mature”.  It really is a great feeling to find that Christmas Cactus that you hauled into the basement after the last blooming and then brought out actually budding up and preparing to display once more.  Also to have an orchid that blooms and blooms on 3or 4 ice cubes a week, gives a sense of achieving artwork. (Although it is hard on the Scotch on the Rocks supply) 
 
I believe people have to like the plants they place in their homes and be motivated to keep them happy.  For first timers, go to nurseries and see what you like.  Then if you know anyone who has plants try and mooch.  Much better price point and the competitive “I made it grow bigger than yours” can add another element.  
 
Remember if a plant pot is light to pick up that is a good time to water.  
 
Hibiscus

Register for Summer Classes!

It’s that time of year again! Summer classes will begin on Monday July 2. 

Summer 2018 AoF header

Summer Classes: Monday July 2 – Friday August 24, 2018
Monday classes (7 weeks), Tuesday – Friday classes (8 weeks)Classes cancelled Monday, August 6, 2018

If you’re a returning client and have already let your instructor know you’re coming back you’re already enrolled.  Otherwise you can enroll here.

Transitional Season Break: Monday August 27 – Friday September 7, 2018

Downloadable Printable Schedule 
Online Schedule

Cancellation Policy: Gentle reminder of our 8 hour cancellation policy for group classes and 24 hour cancellation policy for private sessions.  When we receive sufficient notice, you will receive a credit for your class or session.  Otherwise, the entire cost will be processed as if you were in attendance.

E-Transfer Payments: Please note that we do accept e-transfer payments to ‘steffipilates@me.com’