Tag Archives: Flow

Pilates Principle: Flow

The word Flow has become a very hot topic in the fitness industry. These flow video’s often consist of a person or people moving through fancy exercises, often in perfect unison, relativity quickly and with what seems is perfect ease — I feel like they’re always of smiling people too — and there might even be a #fridayfriendflow that insta everything is chasing.

Don’t get caught in the chase or the keeping up!

Instead remind yourself: these video’s are short moments of time capturing the end result of lot’s of practice and development of skill. They can be beautiful to watch and inspiring for your own workout however it is imperative to realize in a world of instant everything with short snippets of exciting moments there are hours of behind the scene dedicated efforts going on.

flowTraditionally, the principle of flow is when routines are completed through a gentle motion with grace, ease and fluidity. Continuous, smooth, and elegant movement is achieved as you transition from one pose to another. According to the principle of flow this will bring strength and stamina.

How to practice this principle effectively:

  • spend time in practice, slow intentional practice of the transitions
    • let’s use a golf swing as an example (a client Steve Knipping made the connection for me)
    • it’s not just the back swing, the follow through or finishing position that must be practiced, explained, or understood
    • instead it is the practice of how you transition from a back swing INTO the follow through INTO the finish position
    • this practice takes a SLOW centering, precision, concentration and control — the brain needs slow so it has time to interpret, repeat and learn new motion
      • as a side note have you noticed how the principles are coming together to achieve a method?

Before starting the practice of the flow between exercises, spend time with in the flow of one exercise. In other words, how do you use the space between the start and the end of one repetition of one movement and how do you use the space between one repetition and the next which creates your set.