Tag Archives: exercise

Isolation is a Myth Revisited

Why it’s important that our muscles can glide their fibres long and short, instead of “clenching”

Human movement is complex.

There are many working parts that come together to help us move – our joints, muscles, nerves and fascia just to name a few.

So, if someone tells you in a movement/Pilates class that you are trying to “isolate” a certain muscle or muscle group – you should be skeptical – or at least you should be, after reading this post.

As Stephanie said in her last blog post: “Generally speaking, if all your attention is on the “one” muscle you think is being isolated the tendency is to “clench and go”. This creates many future problems. “

It’s true, if we try to use one muscle to do a job that is meant for many muscles working in concert, problems can arise:

  • we can actually block the movement we are trying to achieve by holding the muscle tightly
  • we can develop increased tension in the muscle that is difficult to release again
  • tender trigger points or taut bands can develop in the muscle that lead to pain
  • and we can ultimately confuse the brain and nerve connections to that muscle so that it’s difficult to do anything other than clench it in the future

You mean I’m not supposed to clench my muscles to really feel them working?

In short – no. But, let’s take a deeper look into how muscles really work to understand this better…

First of all, muscles don’t act alone. It’s impossible to disregard our nervous system if we are talking about movement:

Our brain sends a message to our nerves, through our spinal cord and on to many more nerves that communicate in a sequence between our brain and each muscle in our body (see picture below). The final nerve in the chain then sends a chemical signal to the muscle itself to tell it to take action. The result, is that the many overlapping muscle fibres within the muscle either contract or relax, to stabilize or move our bones and joints.

Diagram

Zoom in even further to the muscles fibres themselves and there are millions of tiny protein fibres called sarcomeres that change length as our muscles contract and relax.

As a muscle contracts – these fibres overlap more, shortening the overall length of the muscle. When a muscle relaxes after a contraction, or stretches, these fibres overlap less, expanding and lengthening the larger muscle.

So, when the brain sends a “contract” signal to a muscle, many nerves are sending many messages to many muscle fibres to make the entire muscle contract. Our nervous system is in charge of the whole shebang.

One Sarcomere:

Sarcomere

Richfield, David (2014). “Medical gallery of David Richfield”. WikiJournal of Medicine 1 (2). DOI:10.15347/wjm/2014.009. ISSN 2002-4436. – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2264027

If you would like to learn even more information about muscles and their fibres, go to: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarcomere

Quick review:

SYNERGIST: The synergist in a movement is the muscle(s) that stabilises a joint around which movement is occurring, which in turn helps the agonist function effectively. Synergist muscles also help to create the movement.

AGONIST and ANTAGONIST muscles often occur in pairs: as the agonst contracts (and shortens), the opposing muscle or antagonist, relaxes (and lengthens). Example: during a bicep curl, the bicep is the agonist and shortens, and the triceps is the antagonist and lengthens.

However, in our day to day lives, our brain rarely sends a “contract glutes” message, instead the brain sends a “walk” or “sit” or “stand” message. When we produce movement in our joints with our muscles, there is never only ONE muscle working alone to produce that movement. Even when we are using muscles to stabilize a joint and producing virtually no movement – ie. the deep synergist muscles around the hip joint when standing on one leg, there is still not only one muscle working to create that stability and stillness. Our joints are 3-dimensional – there will always be muscles working 360 degrees around them, some shortening while the opposing muscles lengthen, or multiple muscles surrounding the joint contracting simultaneously to create stability. AND sometimes – most of the time – all three of these things are happening all at once.

Isolation is indeed a myth.

Now, you may be saying, “but my (insert rehab or movement professional) has given me exercises to isolate my glutes, core, rotator cuff… before”. While this may be true, there is a very specific purpose for exercises like this. When you have an injury or pain, the brain-muscle connection can weaken or become confused, and so a Physiotherapist may give you exercises to try to “wake up” that brain muscle connection again. However, this type of “isolation” exercise should only be done for a short period of time until the brain-muscle connection strengthens enough to get that muscle working properly again during larger functional movements, like the ones we do in Pilates and in life. Keep in mind, if you are moving your leg while doing “glut isolation exercises”, or moving your arm while doing “rotator cuff exercises”, then you are still using many different muscles working together to move.

So, what happens when you try to isolate certain muscles while doing Pilates?

Well, when you focus your attention on contracting one particular muscle, or you try to use only one muscle to perform a complex movement, it is easy to end up clenching that muscle instead of contracting it effectively. Clenching sends too many “contract” signals to the muscle, so that all of the overlapping fibres are held too tightly, or for too long, and the muscle doesn’t have its usual opportunity to relax so that the muscle fibres can move apart again. Over time if you are continuously trying to isolate or clench one particular muscle or muscle group, this can interfere with a muscle’s ability to relax in general, and tender trigger points or taut bands of muscle can develop, which can eventually lead to muscle pain and tension at rest.

When we allow all of the muscles around a joint to work together to produce leg, arm or spine movement, then each muscle gets a more balanced amount of “contract” signals. They work together to share the load, contracting together, or some contracting while others relax as our bones change position. When we allow muscles to work together – synergists, agonist and antagonists – each one doing their part of the work, then each muscle is able to glide short on contraction, and glide long on relaxation, instead of getting stuck in the shortened position during a “clench”.

So, unless you are in the very early stages of working with a Physiotherapist to rehab after an injury, don’t worry about trying to “isolate” your glutes, core, or any other muscle you might want to work on. When you perform skillful Pilates movements and listen to your instructor’s cues, the work will happen, you will still get the burn, and that post-Pilates soreness will be the “hurts so good” type, and not a confused, painful muscle still trying to relax after being clenched.

Strategies to avoid clenching:

  • LISTEN carefully to your instructors’ cues – at Art of Fitness, the instructors use their words to skillfully guide your movements and shapes, rather than specific muscle contractions, to get your muscles working properly
  • Then, focus on the MOVEMENT you are meant to perform, not just the muscles that are working to get you there – if you do the movement successfully, the work will happen, you will feel the burn, and the load will be shared between all the interested parties/muscles
  • And remember to BREATHE – breath holding often goes hand in hand with bearing down or clenching muscles instead of gliding them long and short with your breath cycles

If you find that you are still clenching after this, then speak with your Pilates/movement instructor to help you change how you are doing a certain movement; and if you have excess tension or pain developing in any of your muscles, find a trusted Physiotherapist for further consultation and treatment which would include manual muscle release, focused muscle relaxation techniques and reprogramming of the brain-muscle connection.

Sarah EbyWritten by Sarah Eby
Physiotherapist and Owner of Root Physiotherapy in Uptown Waterloo
www.rootphysio.com
Facebook: @rootphysio
Instagram: @rootphysiosarah

Clients who Inspire: Carolyn C

Carolyn comes into the Studio four times a week, taking Reformer, Spin and Yoga classes, as well as private sessions with Pj.  She is dedicated to movement and a truly integral piece of our community at KW Art of Fitness. 

Carolyn

 

Tell us a bit about yourself

I’ve been a lifelong resident of K-W along with my husband Dwayne. We have 2 boys, 20 and 19, and recently became empty nesters…for now! I’ve worked with the City of Kitchener for 24 years and get to spend my work days with the amazing older adults who come to Rockway Community Centre. They’re so inspiring and are incredible role models for positive aging! They make coming to work something I look forward to each day. 

 How long have you been coming to the Studio?

Good question! I started when the studio was at RIM park but can’t remember how many years. 10+ for sure. Time flies when you’re having fun! 

Why did you start coming to the Studio?

I’ve always struggled with commitment to exercise. I’m that person who’s had fitness club memberships and never went. What I noticed about the studio right away was how comfortable it felt to be in smaller, more personal classes with really knowledgeable (and fun!) instructors, who build programs which take into account everyone’s goals and challenges. I come to the studio 4 times a week and am sad when I have to miss a day. All the people I’ve met through classes are what makes the studio extra great! 

Carolyn

What other fitness, sport or outdoor activities do you participate in?

I used to play hockey and just started learning how to golf. Apparently my swing looks like a slap shot but hopefully a few more lessons will help. 

Carolyn

Mind Your Words: Isolation is a Myth

Myth: a widely held but false belief or idea.

Isolation is exactly that, a myth.

"The whole body participates in every movement" Irmgard Bartenieff

I made the statement in my last Mind Your Words blog that every energetic expression of movement has to sort through outside force, internal deviations or habits and the complexity of the action.

Part of the complexity of the action is when the brain/body sorts through which muscle(s) will pull(agonist). Which muscle(s) will simultaneously lengthen (antagonist). AND the Movement Instructors favorite place to play; which muscles will act to stabilize the joint around which the movement is happening (synergist).

The complexity the brain/body sorts through also includes what order these actions occur in during movement.

Your brain and body systems know this already. Spend time practicing bringing your ATTENTION to the entire body participation. As opposed to, bringing your attention to the one muscle that happens to be just ONE of the MANY muscle participants.

The body and it’s actions are a highly sophisticated and complex living network.

Every action imposed on the body has three components.

An antagonist muscle, the agonist and the synergist.

For example, during a biceps curl, the triceps is the antagonist muscle. This muscle lengthens as the biceps contracts (agonist).

The synergists stabilize a joint around which movement is occurring and helps to create movement. The nervous system is the conductor of this awesome orchestra.

As a Movement Instructor, we first look for a persons ability to bring their attention to the SYNERGISTS. We then will ask you to challenge the synergists. This challenge occurs via a larger range of motion, more force/tension, or by increasing time within the exercise (endurance of the synergists efforts).

The above request from your instructor results in you feeling the burn or work sensations in a specific area —- for example the ‘glutes.’

Generally speaking, if all your attention is on the “one” muscle you think is being isolated the tendency is to “clench and go”. This creates many future problems.

Sarah Eby, of Roots Physiotherapy, will in a later blog help us understand the importance of muscles that SLIDE their fibers long and short instead of CLENCHING and how our nervous system is an essential piece of the puzzle!

Ever wonder why your Pilates/Movement Instructor sometimes **sighs** or rolls their eyes when you ask in the middle of the action(s) what muscle am I using?

A picture is worth a thousand words: under the surface “glutes”

Anatomy of the gluteal muscles in the human buttocks Canvas Art - Stocktrek Images (16 x 14)

So, NO, you will never spend time at our studio “working your glutes.” You WILL spend time challenging yourself through movements that DO incorporate the ‘glutes’ and all the layers beneath. These challenges will allow the brain/body to orchestrate their action at the correct moment in time. We will help you discover the MAGIC of movement; how to get out of your own way.

We will teach you how to use the power of ATTENTION to get what you need from an exercise INSTEAD of encouraging the myth of isolation to carry on in your mind.

Did you notice that we’re ONLY talking about muscles?

When speaking of exercising our complex living network, we also need to consider and respect many other participators.

To name a few of the other factors that come into every movement:

Nerve pathways

Blood flow

Fascia

Neurological system

Bones, joints, ligaments

Spinal cord fluid

Lymphatic system

Immune system

Sensory proprioceptors, etc.

This above list is why our studio instructors collaborate with Physiotherapists so often.

In lieu of going on, let me pause and instead ask:

Are you seeing how ISOLATION becomes a MYTH?

Definitions:

SYNERGIST: a body organ, medicine, etc., that cooperates with another or others to produce or enhance an effect

ISOLATION: an instance of isolating something, especially a compound or microorganism

ATTENTION: the mental faculty of considering or taking notice of someone or something

CLENCH: (of a muscular part of the body) tighten or contract sharply, especially with strong emotion

 

 

Get to know Stephanie Moore Part II

We are back with some more fun facts about our favourite Studio owner, Steph! 

For those of you that are new here… 

Stephanie understands that no two clients are the same and believes that taking a fresh, fun customizable approach to fitness is vital to success. She draws on her vast knowledge, years of experience, spirit and tools to develop effective alignment patterns which bring understanding to her clients’ kinesthetic sense.

Stephanie also believes that the classes offered at Art of Fitness care for her clients not only physically, but mentally as well. It’s her goal that through specific mechanics, fitness is able to bring clarity, increase perception and stimulate the mind.

“Physical fitness is the first requisite of happiness.”- Joseph Pilates

Pool or Ocean? Infinity Pool on a mountain with an oceanview 
What are your pet peeves? loud chewing, comments on my food, cigarette butt litterbugs, opinions when not asked for, the sentence “that’s not how you’re supposed to do that” 
What is your go-to splurge? art supplies 
What is the must have item in your closet? moccasins, scarves 
Last concert you went to? Neil Young 
How do you take your coffee? every which way 
What is your theme song? Break My Stride 
What is your sign? Aquarius 
Which sound instantly puts you in a good mood? Great music, someone tripping, 
What’s your favourite thing to eat after class? Water – Apple – Cheese 
If you have a free hour you… Nap 
Book you can read over and over? I never have done that
What’s your guilty pleasure? Summer Sausage
Where have you always wanted to travel? Scandinavia 
Your current healthy obsession is… keeping it simple 
Your spirit animal… Hansy 
What is your favourite part about being an Instructor? the people and creativity 

If you missed Steph’s first feature you can find it here.

Words UNSPOKEN Communicate

Communication for Connection – much more than the words we say.

The words we speak represent less than 10% of the message delivered.

Communicate

Even when we use words, it’s not just the words we say that matter – it’s the tone of our voice, facial expressions, or even the shapes we make with our bodies. The body knows and doesn’t lie.

Through learning The Model of Human Behaviour, I learned why my husband would have referred to me as, “excessively happy.” How is this possible!?

Ahhh: the case to be made for personalities, how we process information, and what are the respective needs of the various profiles (Model of Human Behaviour types). There are astonishing distinctions between the four types: D (Dominant type); I (Influence); S (Steadiness); and C (Compliance). Each of these ‘types’ has very unique differences and life-giving needs.

 

ChessHigh “C’s” tend to want to socialize less & focus on details, logic, and accuracy.

High “D’s” like to be in control, like a challenge, and need autonomy to make decisions & solve problems.

 

 

Social

High “I’s” most want others to be friendly, emotionally honest and want to be recognized for their contributions.

High “S’s” most need others to be relaxed, agreeable, cooperative & appreciative.

 

If/when we fail to perceive and speak to these differing ways of communicating and orienting, we might be down and out before we ever get up and going.

Have you ever felt like this, and maybe wondered – hey! What just happened?

The different profiles (and we all have some of each type in our unique blend) are actually like a different language that includes nuances specific to tempo, details, and the attending emotional needs that go along with our strengths.

Dr. Robert Rohm says we must beware to not tolerate and until we can annihilate but rather learn to celebrate our differences. However, we cannot beware until we are aware. The Model of Human Behaviour is a lot of fun, easy to learn, and mastery of this skill makes life and relationships improve like magic. As a Master Trainer and life skills coach (a “Guide to all things Great” ©), I never leave home without this highly energizing, user-friendly tool.

Communicate

Remember the adage: it’s not the words we say but the music we play? This learned skill is where the music happens – where words, tempo, and other unique flourishes have the result of everyone feeling like they matter. Isn’t this what we would all like?

Feeling seen and heard supports a sense of worth and respect. All manner of connections begin here – fundamentals in the human dynamic.

What could our world become if there was a little more of “us”/presence, engaging through the art and science of listening, and fewer of our words?

BTW: listening and responding to others in their preferred style (D, I, S, C) accomplishes connection – that sense of being love, peace, possibility, friendship, better relationships overall – even making better choices for our fitness and training needs. People “light up” when they learn about themselves inside this model.

Question: whose responsibility is it to get your needs met?

“Close the language-door and open the love-window. The moon won’t use the door, only the window.”  – Jelaluddin RUMI (1207-1273

— Judith
Judithlharrison.com

Teach Don’t Tell

For the Pilates participants who may be reading this, the perspective below offers a glimpse into part of what goes on behind the scenes;

the mind of the instructor;

the person who can NOT count to 10 — forwards or backwards 😀

The aim is to clear up just why we, Pilates Movement Instructors, are so darn persnickety, and why we take our storytelling skill so seriously!

Patience

Teach, Don’t Tell

Movement Instructors connect words with actions, simultaneously offering relevant reasons to motivate the participants intention and attention to said action. We are fostering intelligent communication for connection between teacher and client; the cues we use are meant to describe and inspire the idea of a movement that has energetic expression. This is our art.

Our underlying quest as instructors in our storytelling skill is for clients to experience success. To feel like the time spent pursuing quality movement was a worthwhile endeavour.  Sometimes, this pressure surrounding the self created quest takes our storytelling skills down a notch. We find ourselves relying to heavily on anatomical details or ‘feeling’ the exercise/movements, in a specific area or repeating go-to phrases the industry has latched on to.

There is a danger in being too anatomical or too focused on what or where someone “should be feeling” an exercise. Let’s face it; some of us don’t care what moves who where, some of us feel to much and even more of us don’t have any feelings at all …. AND we’re all snowflakes, each one of us different, with different needs and goals.

When the Movement Instructor and the client can get out of our own way and step cleanly into the moment in front of us, the body systems and the brain know how to move, the story is being told, teaching action is happening, the magic takes place …

Motivation and the Pleasure Seeking Brain

The pleasure seeking brain is continually searching out and repeating action that makes life easier. When action results in making life easier the brain categorizes the action as pleasure. The pleasure causes the brain to look for ways to groom and groove excellent movement patterns, this becomes motivation.

Storytelling skill (cueing) aims to borrow that instinctive desire and drive the individual to continually ‘tidy up’ movements, until there is the awesome moment of “effortless effort”.

“Effortless Effort”

What?! (Insert eye roll here…)

Pilates is designed to give you the opportunity to work better, THEN harder, while encouraging participants to always avoid working harder then is necessary.

Clean (i.e effortless effort) movement demands efficiency, Pilates teaches that, grooms that, and ultimately what was once your workout becomes your warm up.

As Movement Instructors we endeavor to:

Step up, be prepared to explain an action in several different ways. Explore cueing until you see the action being understood or you see the light bulb going off behind the eyes of the client.

Work towards understanding how the client learns. What brought the client through the door in the first place? Why do they keep coming back? We need to learn to adapt our cues and expressions to match the person in front of us.

Be clear. We all have our ‘go to’ expressions. For example: belly button to spine. Let’s make sure we first express what we actually are asking for. Avoid relying on and assuming a phrase will always inspire the correct action.

Address complex action simply. Sometimes the list of cues are LONG, be sure to highlight a priority. In other words, emphasis what shouldn’t be sacrificed in order to accomplish another action further down the list of cues.

One of my favorite teaching moments is between breathing and action. If the effort to create an action causes you to hold your breath, the sacrifice is too great. In other words, if you catch yourself holding your breath, reign it in, work only as hard as you can breath consistently.

Teach, Don’t Tell

Simply means exploring with clients to learn what to say in order to help someone organize and co-ordinate a movement. Look at what happens when the client does what you asked them to do.  Then identify and address perhaps TWO of the most important corrections according to their demonstration.

Both the Movement Instructor and the client need to allow for room to grow into the actions. It takes time for the brain to instinctively and confidently adapt movement patterns. Every energetic expression of the teachers cue has to sort through outside force, internal deviations or habits and the complexity of the action.

Your brain and body systems know this and will learn to re-organize itself according to the brain’s pleasure response.

Client

As Clients, You Can Help Us Be Better:

We need you to speak up when what we’re asking for sounds like a foreign language.

Do you keep hearing a phrase that you feel or think is wrong for your body? Ask the instructor to explain themselves or to paraphrase what they are saying.

If you’re given a bony landmark or a muscle or a feeling/sensation as a reference point, speak up if that reference point is even a little bit foggy. There are hundreds of ways to describe an action.

Be patient with yourself, it’s just Pilates. #gregpember

Brilliance Lives Here: Leonard Cornelisse

We would like to introduce one of our clients, Leonard, who participates in weekly group classes, including Spin, Matwork and Reformer. 
 
Leonard comes into the Studio with a ready to work attitude. He has the ability to challenge his Instructors to get him to work deeper in his movements. We, as Instructors, love to come up with new ways to push him; and feel a sense of a job well done once an email pops through after classes telling us just how much he feels his muscles. Leonard is warm and witty, making an entire class laugh with his out of no where one liners. 
 
Leonard
 
A few words from Leonard… 

 

I came to KW in 1997 after having studied Audiology and working at the University of Western Ontario. I work as a hearing scientist for a Canadian hearing aid company called Unitron, in Kitchener.

Somewhere around middle age, I had the realization that I was no longer young and rather more out of shape than I cared to admit. I started swimming, and then added cycling as exercise. When the following winter came, I decided to try running and as summer approached I realized that I should put those three activities together and at least attempt a beginner triathlon. Somewhere in that time period I also started to practice yoga in an effort to improve my flexibility. I enjoyed training for and participating in various running, cycling and triathlon races for several years, racing mostly for fun. However, I started to have various injuries and issues. Fortunately through a running club I learned about the benefits of Pilates. I started at KW Art of Fitness about four years ago. I chose KW Art of Fitness, because of the variety of classes that it offers, in addition to Pilates, and because it is a smaller more intimate studio, with very friendly and personalized service.

In my free time, I enjoy walking my dog or playing with my grandchildren, when I am not exercising.

Why we shut down: Part II

It’s approaching that time at the studio … season transition, also known as: studio shutdown.
 

This seasonal transition is going to be for two weeks **gasp**shock**

Could it be true? Do we dare, you ask?

Art of Fitness

On, June 22, 2018, we posted a blog on the benefits clients could experience via our scheduled studio shutdowns simply by creating their own change in routine for rest & recovery. Why we shut down: Part II, will give you more insight into why a small business would dare take time away.
 

Inspiration was found a couple of years ago after reading an article, ‘Time Off Helps You Thrive in Life and Career.(2016,Huffington Post,By Caroline Dowd-Higgins).

What stuck in my mind is the statement “Be the Boss Who Sets a Good Example.” The article explains how our behaviour sets an example for others around you. That in fact, you should “honour your vacation time, that others will follow suit and enjoy their vacation time without guilt or concern.”
 
This article sparked in me a slightly unique business plan that I felt compelled to implement. Scheduled studio shutdown represents a plan that clearly provides for clients access to instructors that ‘walk the talk’ of the commonly used phrase: work/life balance.
 
So, great your instructors ‘get to’ take time to refresh, revitalize and reset mentally, but what’s in it for you?
 

Here’s what’s in it for you:

  • The studio goes through a deep clean thanks to Terry’s (featured in the video!) energy & elbow grease, her amazing attention to cleanliness detail never fails to impress.
    • Everything is taken off shelves to be cleaned, ceiling fans are wiped down, and of course all the regular twice a week vacuuming and floor mopping.
  • Equipment maintenance: springs, attachments, hinges, bearings, general upkeep.
    • Scheduled studio shutdown is when it happens.
    • Every time you use the equipment in our studio you can feel safe that all parts are in working order, seriously those springs could be dangerous!
    • Watch a video of exactly what Steph does on our Instagram or Facebook account!  
  • On the surface work life balance for your instructor certainly feels like it’s all about us. However, it’s a real WIN WIN situation — ever wonder why it seems that your instructors love what they do?
    • It’s because they do.
    • AND
    • Because we work hard to run a business in a way that respects human natures need for change, rest, reflection.
    • This allows for time to rejuvenate our ability to be teach, inspire and make movement relevant to each individual that walks in our door.

 

The Inspiration behind KW Art of Fitness

We sat down with Steph, the inspiration and heart behind KW Art of Fitness and asked her some questions on how she brought her dream of sharing the benefits of Pilates with clients in Kitchener/Waterloo to life. 

Stephanie

What was your first experience with Pilates?

At the turn of the century (I’ve always wanted a reason to say that …) I took my first Continuing Education Course, Gait Analysis, for my Personal Training Certification (Can-Fit-Pro) continuing education credits (CEC) at Body Harmonics. At this point I had already been a personal trainer for a year or so and my curiosity had drawn me towards the “new” or perhaps the rebranded concepts of Functional Training (my interest lay in Paul Chek of the Chek Institute).

 

When did you know you wanted to become an Instructor?
Where did you become Certified? 

After taking that first Pilates based workshop I started to do research on this thing called “Pilates.” Through heavy squats, boxing and a wet rainy summer of working in the landscaping industry,  I had an SI Injury and tendinitis in both my hands, wrists and shoulders, resulting in major restrictions within my own functional and traditional weight training options. While doing my research on where I could become certified in Pilates, I came across Second Wind Pilates Plus that offered an in-depth Mat Pilates Certification Course in tandem with Integrated Movement Therapies. I signed up for that course with the intention of taking Pilates into my personal workout regimes as well as into my training with clients.
 
Between experiencing some brilliant options which helped to piece my body back together and realizing how complimentary Pilates is to my original training journey into ‘functional fitness’, I was hooked. I jumped into becoming a Pilates Instructor out of excitement for my own body and healing as well as what this may do for others who love fitness but may have some beaten up movement patterns, joints and muscles. It was a fantastic blend for me and in turn my clients. From there I went to an event called Pilates on Tour and had my first experience on the Reformer with this crazy little ball then called the “coach ball”… hook – line and sinker, at that moment I knew I would be figuring out how, where and when I would find or make a space that allowed for me to have a reformer.
 

What courses have you taken since?

  • Can-Fit-Pro Personal Training
  • Second Wind Pilates Plus:Mat Pilates, Integrated Movement Therapies
  • Body Harmonics: Reformer, Cadillac, Chair and Barrels
  • Pilates for Neurological Conditions
  • Check Institute: Primal Movement Patterns, Scientific Balance Training
  • CPTN: Post Rehabiliation Functional Training: Upper Body
  • Schwinn Cycling: World Class Conditioning
  • Anatomy Trains in Motion

How did you get started after you became certified?

I was already a Personal Trainer at a large gym and had made a recent move to a small private training facility. That location did not have the space to allow for me to offer classes, so I went on to search out an option this being the Kitchener Waterloo Skating Club (KWSC). KWSC was home for my launching as a Pilates Instructor and I enjoyed my time working with both figure skaters and the general public. After a few years my business out grew the space availability within the KWSC and that is what started my search for the space we currently reside in. 

Did you ever work in someone else’s Studio?

I have worked in large corporate gyms, small private training studio’s and at the Kitchener Waterloo Skating Club however this is the only Pilates Studio that I have worked at.

 

When did you dream up KW Art of Fitness?
Where did the name “KW Art of Fitness” come from?

My original education was in Fine Arts — I have been and continue to be an artist and interestingly enough that Bachelor of Art Degree has helped me more then I would have ever thought. The most direct help was the study of the body for Life Drawing — learning to see movement, moving parts, the action of energy and force (gravity, objects, action) through a body, and then trying to capture the essence of that on paper set me up for what it would take to learn, understand and then communicate movement and action to people. So, the name — ART of fitness is because I am an artist, my whole life has been about giving myself the opportunity to be an artist. 
 
Growing up on a hobby farm I have been a mover and shaker since I was young, piling wood, ‘helping’ my grandpa, dad and older brother bring the hay in, carrying pails, riding horses, rock picking fields, weeding … leading into track and field (sprinting of all things … short but fast), badminton, kickboxing, boxing and among all those sports always was a great coach teaching the benefits of strength training. This lifestyle was coupled with my Mom who baked from scratch and created healthy wholesome meals, building in me the perception that FITNESS is about how we define it, and in fact, being “fit”, and teaching other “how to be fit” is indeed a form of art, the science, very important, the art in how to help others stay tuned in and interested in learning instead of following orders, that is an art, a very magical art.
 
And there you have it “KW Art of Fitness Inc”

 

Where did your studio layout inspiration come from?

My inspiration for the studio came from a few sources, most notably Body Harmonics and my impression of how Margot McKinnon had gone about setting herself, instructors and clients up. As well, it came from my work with my clients, what they need, how we could best offer this while including more people. I used my art background and my Mom’s design experience to utilize colour and layout to create an atmosphere of unique, energizing and personalized space for each person walking in.

 

Where does your inspiration continue to come from?

My biggest source of inspiration comes from when I am teaching, seeing how people move, what are people understanding, doing well, wanting more of … how can I keep myself and others motivated to really understand and learn about themselves instead of this thing we call ‘fitness’. Other times it is a small seed that is planted when at a workshop, watching another instructor teach someone, taking classes and private sessions myself or sometimes out walking the dog(s) reflecting on what stands out in my mind from the day before, what’s up for this day — whose on deck, how can I show up and be excellent for each client and in turn myself?

 

Why Pilates?

Because it is magical.

The Underbelly of the World of Overwhelm: More is NOT Always Better

It has been said the “What we do matters. Who we are matters much more.”

And, that one word – more – is our key to todays look in on where is your life hanging out – in excellence or overwhelm?

Judith

Lets start with a few questions like:

  • Are you doing your best work as a leader yet feeling you are failing to make an impact? Or, if not you, perhaps someone close to you?
  • Have you ever felt stuck, powerless to change your environment or even your day-to-day experience of a world moving at a frenetic pace of demands for “more”?
  • Do you feel too overwhelmed to enjoy life, unable to sort out the demands on your time

If you answered yes to any one of these questions then settle in, take a deep breath or three and ponder the following with us, if you will.

One of the disabling elements against our sense of a fit life – emotional or physical – is a mindset that measures success by demanding “more”. In all our training and conditioning – physical fitness included – the mistake that repeats itself, and drives us relentlessly, is how we isolate and fragment as though the different parts of a self don’t work together. This includes all of the aspects that we imagine constitute a self, or a life, or a job well done. And, to worsen this sorry state of affairs, we measure our success based on outer appearances or what we think others will value. When we keep the various parts of our ‘self’, and aspects of our life, isolated each from the other we are guaranteed to eventually experience exhaustion, loneliness, angst, and eventually dissatisfaction and/or disillusionment, even despair.

This stems from a paradigm of doing rather than being, among other aspects of our socializing experience. That is to say we derive our sense of worth from an exterior orientation rather than an interior sense of stability and wellbeing.

art

An outer orientation sets up like this: when I get this…I will be happy; when I accomplish that…I will be a success; when I have ‘this much’ in my bank account…I will be good enough; when I…well, you get the idea. We “do this in order to get that”. This approach is like an addiction; it leaves us coming up with/as ‘not enough’ and needing the ubiquitous “more”.

“More” is killing us: stress, judgments, anger, frustration, depression, and exhaustion; dis-eases of the body-mind-soul. Where is “more” showing up in your life? What would it take to set up an attitude of “The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Bleep” (see Events at WellnessVie.com). In this book Mark Hanson advises us to get to know our limitations and accept them – this, he says, is the real source of empowerment. I like to think of this in terms of the malcontent content and the capacity for living with our vulnerabilities.

Isn’t it a time for a quiet revolution? Would you be willing to ask yourself some different questions and not be in a hurry to find the answers or reach the goal at the expense of a well-lived journey? Dare to “Live the questions”- questions that address life from a perspective of ‘is this life-giving’?

As a Psychotherapist and Guide to all things Great, I know that our greatest gift is our willingness to bring curiosity to our life’s experiences – as children do! They live life as an adventure, and thereby thrive; why not us? Why not now? And, if not now, when? 

– Judith